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Units April 29, 2022

The Rhetorical Implications of the Victor

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Lesson Summary: Students analyze the rhetorical nature of how historical events are presented through analysis and discussion of works in The 1619 Project. Links: The 1619 project: complete pdf Reading guide for the 1619 project essays Reading guide for the 1619 project creative works
SECTIONS


This unit was created by a team of educators in the Piper School Districtas part of the 2021 cohort of The 1619 Project Education Network. It is designed for facilitation across approximately two weeks or five 90-minute sessions.

Objectives and Outcomes

Students will be able to…

  • Use rhetorical analysis to examine a range of essays and creative works about slavery and American history
  • Consider the implications of how historical events are portrayed 
  • Synthesize their thinking and draw conclusions in response to a central inquiry question in essay and discussion formats
  • Students will increase perspective and understanding about the narratives of history and how they get constructed.
  • Students will be able write critically, using their own thinking synthesized with high-level texts
  • Students will be able to read and annotate high-level texts.

Essential Question

Who writes history and how does history get written?

Unit Overview

Students will analyze the rhetorical nature of how historical events are presented. Through analysis and discussion of a range of texts from The 1619 Project, they will answer the inquiry question: Who writes history? Students will analyze texts and examples to draw conclusions into a cohesive essay.

Performance Task

Students will explore the following inquiry question through composition and civil discourse: Who writes history and how does history get written?
Timed Essay:
Students will answer the inquiry question: Who writes history? They will use a rhetorical lens to explain their reasoning.

Socratic Seminar:
Students will engage in a Socratic Seminar to ask questions, express their thinking, and listen to their peers.

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