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Units January 31, 2022

1619 Project Humanities: Building Background

Lesson Summary: Students explore the five podcast episodes from The 1619 Project and apply annotation skills while closely reading the paired essays. They also use this information to answer essential questions both in writing through CER (claim, evidence, reasoning) responses, and as part of Socratic seminar discussions with peers. Downloads: Unit resources
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This unit was created by educators in Cherokee Heights Middle School, as part of the 2021 cohort of The 1619 Project Education Network. It is designed for facilitation across approximately thirty-five 60-to-90 minute class periods.

Objectives

Students will be able to...

  • Build basic background knowledge about The 1619 Project
  • Explain using evidence from the text how the legacy of slavery impacts society today
  • Analyze a complex text independently and use background knowledge to write a grade level argumentative response (CER)
  • Discuss difficult topics with peers using discussion protocols

Essential Questions

1. How does the legacy of slavery still show up today?

2. What would it mean to start our study of American History with the year 1619? Why is that significant?

3. Which stories in history are elevated, and which are ignored or overlooked? Why?

Unit Overview

In this unit designed for English Language Immersion (ELI) and Dual Language Immersion (DLI) humanities classes, students explore the five podcast episodes from The 1619 Project and apply annotation skills while closely reading the paired essays. They use this information to answer one of the essential questions both in writing through CER (claim, evidence, reasoning) responses, and as part of Socratic seminar discussions with peers:

Each of the essential questions will be discussed weekly via a Socratic Seminar based on the podcast and essay excerpt. The question that students will focus on each week depends on which of the above essential questions aligns best with the content. For example, when reading and discussing “The Idea of America,” students tie their thinking to essential question number 3.

Performance Task

Students independently answer a Claim Evidence Reasoning question [.pdf] [.docx] about the essay "Mass Incarceration" by Bryan Stevenson that addresses the following standards:

  • R.10I can read an excerpt of "Mass Incarceration" independently with accuracy
  • W.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence

Question: Based on the essay "Mass Incarceration," how does the legacy of slavery still show up today?

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